About Rachel Blair Wakeford

About Rachel Blair Wakeford

ASW Therapist #95353, EMDR trained

Supervised by Amanda Jabon, LCSW #82020

I enjoy utilizing psychodynamic theory, which allows for the client to gain a deeper sense of understanding of what is happening in their unconscious. This approach is helpful to clients because it allows them to dig deeper into their past to gain awareness of where they are in the present.

Additionally, I have experience with mindfulness and relaxation techniques. I am passionate about working with children, adolescents, and young adults. These populations are often undergoing transitional periods and abrupt stages of change that can cause anxiety, extreme stress, and other mental aspects of their health. I have conducted research on mental health in children, as well as homelessness. Some of my particular areas of interest are: grief, loss, trauma, attachment, depression, anxiety, OCD, relationship conflict, and adjustment difficulties.

My capacity for empathy and allowing my clients a healthy and safe space to grow and heal is something I value deeply. I have a strong passion for helping others find their sense of purpose and meaning, and will do so through the appropriate therapeutic approach.

​I have experience providing therapy at a variety of hospitals in which I worked with diagnoses such as: cancer, hospice, end-of-life, substance abuse, sexual assault, domestic violence, personality disorders, depression, anxiety, and schizophrenia.

Education

​Having received my Master of Social Work degree from East Carolina University, I have utilized my education and experience in an array of populations such as: grief/bereavement, end of life, various mental health diagnoses, and trauma.

Qualifications

  • School: East Carolina University
  • Year Graduated: 2020
  • License and State: 95353 California
  • License and State: #P014598 North Carolina

Additional Credentials

  • Membership: National Association of Social Workers

Associations

  • National Association of Social Workers
  • Psychology Today